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Designed for students having no previous experience with rigorous proofs, this text can be used immediately after standard calculus courses. It is highly recommended for anyone planning to study advanced analysis, as well as for future secondary school teachers. A limited number of concepts involving the real line and functions on the real line are studied, while many abstract ideas, such as metric spaces and ordered systems, are avoided completely. A thorough treatment of sequences of numbers is used as a basis for studying standard calculus topics, and optional sections invite students to study such topics as metric spaces and Riemann-Stieltjes integrals.
Designed for students having no previous experience with rigorous proofs, this text on analysis is intended to follow a standard calculus course. It will be useful for students planning to continue in mathematics (with, for example, complex variables, differential equations, numerical analysis, multivariable calculus, or statistics), as well as for future secondary school teachers.
Designed for students having no previous experience with rigorous proofs, this text on analysis is intended to follow a standard calculus course. It will be useful for students planning to continue in mathematics (with, for example, complex variables, differential equations, numerical analysis, multivariable calculus, or statistics), as well as for future secondary school teachers.
It is hard to imagine that another elementary analysis book would contain ma terial that in some vision could qualify as being new and needed for a discipline already abundantly endowed with literature. However, to understand analysis, be ginning with the undergraduate calculus student through the sophisticated math ematically maturing graduate student, the need for examples and exercises seems to be a constant ingredient to foster deeper mathematical understanding. To a talented mathematical student, many elementary concepts seem clear on their first encounter. However, it is the belief of the authors, this understanding can be deepened with a guided set of exercises leading from the so called "elementary" to the somewhat more "advanced" form. Insight is instilled into the material which can be drawn upon and implemented in later development. The first year graduate student attempting to enter into a research environment begins to search for some original unsolved area within the mathematical literature. It is hard for the student to imagine that in many circumstances the advanced mathematical formulations of sophisticated problems require attacks that draw upon, what might be termed elementary techniques. However, if a student has been guided through a serious repertoire of examples and exercises, he/she should certainly see connections whenever they are encountered.