Download Free Digital Community Digital Citizen Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Digital Community Digital Citizen and write the review.

Best-selling author and educator Jason Ohler addresses how today's globally connected infosphere has broadened the definition of citizenship and its impact on educators, students, and parents.
An all-inclusive roadmap to citizenship in the 21st Century Best-selling author, educator, and futurist Jason Ohler challenges all readers to redefine our roles as citizens in today’s globally connected infosphere. His text aligns the process of teaching digital citizenship with the ISTE standards definition, and uses an “ideal school board” device to address fears, opportunities, and the critical issues of character education. These issues include: Cyberbullying, “sexting,” and other safety concerns Students’ ability to creatively access and critically assess information Respect and ethics regarding copyrighted information Communicating appropriately in an expanded and public realm
Best-selling author and educator Jason Ohler addresses how today's globally connected infosphere has broadened the definition of citizenship and its impact on educators, students, and parents.
Students today have always had technology in their lives, so many teachers assume their students are competent tech users — more competent, in fact, than themselves. In reality, not all students are as tech savvy as teachers might assume, and not all teachers are as incompetent as they fear. Even when students are comfortable using technology, they may not be using it appropriately. Likewise, educators of all skill levels may not understand how to use technology effectively. Both students and teachers need to become members of a digital citizenry. In this essential exploration of digital citizenship, Mike Ribble provides a framework for asking what we should be doing with respect to technology so we can become productive and responsible users of digital technologies.
The popular image of the "digital native" -- usually depicted as a technically savvy and digitally empowered teen -- is based on the assumption that all young people are equally equipped to become innovators and entrepreneurs. Yet young people in low-income communities often lack access to the learning opportunities, tools, and collaborators (at school and elsewhere) that help digital natives develop the necessary expertise. This book describes one approach to address this disparity: the Digital Youth Network (DYN), an ambitious project to help economically disadvantaged middle-school students in Chicago develop technical, creative, and analytical skills across a learning ecology that spans school, community, home, and online. The book reports findings from a pioneering mixed-method three-year study of DYN and how it nurtured imaginative production, expertise with digital media tools, and the propensity to share these creative capacities with others. Through DYN, students, despite differing interests and identities -- the gamer, the poet, the activist -- were able to find some aspect of DYN that engaged them individually and connected them to one another. Finally, the authors offer generative suggestions for designers of similar informal learning spaces.
This book challenges the assumptions behind the idea of digital citizenship in order to turn the attention to cases of innovation, social change and public good.
The ease with which digital content can be shared online has, in addition to its many benefits, created a host of problems for today's high school students. All too often, students are uploading, updating, posting, publishing without giving a second thought to who might see their content or how it might be perceived. lol..OMG! provides a cautionary look at the many ways that today's students are experiencing the unanticipated negative consequences of their digital decisions--from lost job opportunities and denied college admissions to full-blown national scandals. It also examines how technology is allowing students to bully one another in new and disturbing ways, and why students are often crueler online than in-person. By using real-life case studies and offering actionable strategies and best practices, this book empowers students to clean up and maintain a positive online presence, and to become responsible digital citizens.

Best Books