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Let every voice be heard! Developing Voice Through the Language Arts shows prospective teachers how to use the language arts to connect diverse students to the world around them and help them develop their own literate voices. This book considers the integrated nature of the primary language arts - reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing, and visually representing. Authors Kathryn Henn-Reinke and Geralyn A. Chesner encourage preservice and inservice teachers to take a reflective, balanced approach in preparing to teach language arts.
If you're a composition instructor, the longstanding wrangling over which voice to foster in the classroom - the native or the academic - doesn't help you teach 100 entering freshman, each with wildly different voices. In fact, the argument over voice invariably focuses on what you should be doing-not on what your student writers ARE doing. Voice as Process looks at how student writers use the voices of home and community to develop an academic voice. Through a thorough textual analysis of student portfolios, copious interviews, and ethnographic research, Lizbeth Bryant identifies the activities that writers perform as they manipulate the voices they bring to class, and those they encounter there, into a web of constructed voices that can be adjusted to meet the needs of any writing situation. Only then, after research and reflection on student choices, does Bryant return to address the instructor's role in the process. She argues for a new view of voice - as a process of construction - and, drawing on composition and pedagogical theory, explores the implications of this view. It's time to start focusing the debate over student voice onto student needs. "Writing teachers cannot abandon discussions of voice exclusively to the domain of theorists," writes Bryant. And while "composition scholarship has offered either/or solutions," to the voice conundrum, students need help building new voices not only for use in academic papers, but also for standardized testing, business writing, journalistic writing, scientific writing, and many other real-world applications. Read Voice as Process and be ready to support your students as they develop voices to negotiate the challenges they face in the academy and beyond.
EARLY CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCES IN LANGUAGE ARTS: EARLY LITERACY, Eleventh Edition responds to national legislation, professional standards, and public concern about the development of young children's language and foundational literacy skills by providing current research-based instructional strategies in early language development. Activities throughout emphasize the relationship between listening, speaking, reading, writing (print), and viewing in language arts areas. This text addresses the cultural and ethnic diversity of children and provides techniques and tips for adapting curricula. Theory is followed by how-to suggestions and plentiful examples of classic books and stories, poems, finger plays, flannel board and alphabet experiences, puppetry, language games, drama, and phonemic and phonetic awareness activities. Students will also learn how, as teachers, they can best interact with children to promote appropriate language development, and how they can create a print-rich environment in the classroom. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
Find your voice–and make your writing sing! &break;&break;You know a great literary "voice" when you hear it: David Sedaris' humorous cynicism. Elmore Leonard's weary, smart-mouthed dialogue. Nick Hornby's simple yet imaginative descriptions. It's the kind of writing you should aspire to, right? &break;&break;Well...not quite. Each of these authors found success in part by developing their own unique voice: a writing style that helped define - and throw the spotlight on - their work. &break;&break;Now Les Edgerton shows you how to develop a voice of your own, one that rises above the literary din because of its individuality, not in spite of it! &break;&break;Inside, he provides guidelines, advice and dozens of exercises for recognizing and developing a natural style that will make your characters, stories and dialogue better and more memorable. You'll learn: &break;&break; How to make any piece you write unmistakably yours and yours alone&break; What agents and editors really think about using your own voice&break; How to write better by ignoring the rules&break; The keys to getting your voice and personality on the page&break; How to get back the unique voice you may have lost by trying to write like someone else &break;&break;Whether you write fiction, non-fiction or poetry, Finding Your Voice is a must for your personal library. Let's face it - editors, agents and readers all want to read something fresh and new. By finding your voice, you'll be giving them exactly what they want!
Empowering the Voice of the Teacher Researcher through a Culture of Inquiry is essentially a description of one school's initiatives to use collaborative communities and action research to empower teacher research and a culture of collective inquiry. It is written by teachers primarily for teachers and teacher educators. Of course, none of the initiatives described in the text would be possible without the visionary leadership of school and district administrators. Because administrative support is foundational to the process, school and district administrators and staff developers will also be interested in reading about how this school's principal and assistant principal set the stage for developing their community of learners. There are many sound action research texts on the market. What sets this text apart are the first-person accounts of teachers' experiences with action research as examples of profound possibilities for professional growth. As such, this book, written by teachers for other teachers and then contextualized by the Editors so that the relevance is clear to a broader audience, fills an important niche in the literature.
Language Arts: Integrating Skills for Classroom Teaching provides a clear and succinct introduction to teaching the language arts to elementary students, focusing on integrating the six language arts with other subject areas. This practical, hands-on text adroitly incorporates the IRA/NCTE Standards and provides guidance on differentiating instruction to bring out the best in the rapidly growing numbers of students with special needs English Language Learners in the regular classroom.
In this study, Bartlett presents a theoretical and descriptive development in the discipline of Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) extending the recent trend away from critiques of hegemonic practices and towards the description of alternative and minority practices that has been labelled Positive Discourse Analysis (PDA). Through an in-depth case study of intercultural development discourse, the book goes beyond the top-down model of power in CDA and the oppositional approach of PDA to develop a model of power in language as multifaceted and potentially collaborative. This model is used to analyse the particular circumstances of the case study, but is primarily presented as a framework for practical applied linguistic contributions within a wide range of sociocultural contexts. Drawing on social and linguistic theory and methods from a range of functional and applied approaches to language, the book explores the connections between language form and social function, the contextual constraints on discursive action and the potential for the renegotiation of existing discourses and social practices.

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