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This book describes and analyses many cipher systems ranging from the earliest and most elementary to the most recent and sophisticated(RSA and DES).
A cipher is a scheme for creating coded messages for the secure exchange of information. Throughout history, many different coding schemes have been devised. One of the oldest and simplest mathematical systems was used by Julius Caesar. This is where Mathematical Ciphers begins. Building on that simple system, Young moves on to more complicated schemes, ultimately ending with the RSA cipher, which is used to provide security for the Internet. This book is structured differently from most mathematics texts. It does not begin with a mathematical topic, but rather with a cipher. The mathematics is developed as it is needed; the applications motivate the mathematics. As is typical in mathematics textbooks, most chapters end with exercises. Many of these problems are similar to solved examples and are designed to assist the reader in mastering the basic material. A few of the exercises are one-of-a-kind, intended to challenge the interested reader. Implementing encryption schemes is considerably easier with the use of the computer. For all the ciphers introduced in this book, JavaScript programs are available from the Web. In addition to developing various encryption schemes, this book also introduces the reader to number theory. Here, the study of integers and their properties is placed in the exciting and modern context of cryptology. Mathematical Ciphers can be used as a textbook for an introductory course in mathematics for all majors. The only prerequisite is high school mathematics.
In this introductory textbook the author explains the key topics in cryptography. He takes a modern approach, where defining what is meant by "secure" is as important as creating something that achieves that goal, and security definitions are central to the discussion throughout. The author balances a largely non-rigorous style — many proofs are sketched only — with appropriate formality and depth. For example, he uses the terminology of groups and finite fields so that the reader can understand both the latest academic research and "real-world" documents such as application programming interface descriptions and cryptographic standards. The text employs colour to distinguish between public and private information, and all chapters include summaries and suggestions for further reading. This is a suitable textbook for advanced undergraduate and graduate students in computer science, mathematics and engineering, and for self-study by professionals in information security. While the appendix summarizes most of the basic algebra and notation required, it is assumed that the reader has a basic knowledge of discrete mathematics, probability, and elementary calculus.
A sweeping, in-depth history of NSA, whose famous “cult of silence” has left the agency shrouded in mystery for decades The National Security Agency was born out of the legendary codebreaking programs of World War II that cracked the famed Enigma machine and other German and Japanese codes, thereby turning the tide of Allied victory. In the postwar years, as the United States developed a new enemy in the Soviet Union, our intelligence community found itself targeting not soldiers on the battlefield, but suspected spies, foreign leaders, and even American citizens. Throughout the second half of the twentieth century, NSA played a vital, often fraught and controversial role in the major events of the Cold War, from the Korean War to the Cuban Missile Crisis to Vietnam and beyond. In Code Warriors, Stephen Budiansky—a longtime expert in cryptology—tells the fascinating story of how NSA came to be, from its roots in World War II through the fall of the Berlin Wall. Along the way, he guides us through the fascinating challenges faced by cryptanalysts, and how they broke some of the most complicated codes of the twentieth century. With access to new documents, Budiansky shows where the agency succeeded and failed during the Cold War, but his account also offers crucial perspective for assessing NSA today in the wake of the Edward Snowden revelations. Budiansky shows how NSA’s obsession with recording every bit of data and decoding every signal is far from a new development; throughout its history the depth and breadth of the agency’s reach has resulted in both remarkable successes and destructive failures. Featuring a series of appendixes that explain the technical details of Soviet codes and how they were broken, this is a rich and riveting history of the underbelly of the Cold War, and an essential and timely read for all who seek to understand the origins of the modern NSA. From the Hardcover edition.
It's thoughtless to start using something you don't trust. It's difficult to start trusting something you don't understand. Bitcoin for Nonmathematicians contains answers to the following questions: how bitcoin is different from other payment systems, and why we can trust cryptocurrencies. The book compares bitcoin with its predecessors and competitors, and demonstrates the benefits of cryptocurrency over any other existing methods of payments. Bitcoin for Nonmathematicians starts from overview of the evolution of payment systems from gold and paper money to payment cards to cryptocurrencies, and ends up with explaining the fundamentals of security and privacy of crypto payments by explaining the details of cryptography behind bitcoin in layman's terms.
Choice Outstanding Academic Title 2014 Literature after Globalization offers a detailed study of recent literary and theoretical responses to technology, globalization, and national identity. Focusing on texts of the the 1990s and 2000s, particularly novels and other writing by Mark Danielewski, Hari Kunzru, Indra Sinha, and Neal Stephenson, it charts a departure from narratives of globalization which declare the collapse of national cultures, and it considers how national sovereignty has been reinvented and reasserted in the face of technology's transnational effects. Drawing upon recent theoretical responses to technology and culture (including work by Yochai Benkler, Manuel Castells, Gilles Deleuze, Jacques Derrida, N. Katherine Hayles, Paul Virilio, and McKenzie Wark) this book will explore how, in these novels, the notion of an inclusive globalization has been replaced by a sense of national globalism.

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