Download Free Closing The Education Gap Benefits And Costs Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Closing The Education Gap Benefits And Costs and write the review.

How much would it cost and what would the benefits be if blacks and Hispanics graduated from high school, went to college, and graduated from college at the same rate as non-Hispanic whites? The answer to this important question for the future of the nation is explored in this report. The costs of education would be high, increasing by about 20 percent in California and 10 percent in the rest of the nation. But the benefits, in the form of savings in public health and welfare expenditures and increased tax revenues from higher incomes, would be even higher. Indeed, the added costs of providing more education to minorities would be recouped well within the lifetime of taxpayers called upon to make the additional investments. The nation is experiencing a rapid immigration driven increase in the share of Hispanics in the school age population. Failure to increase the educational attainment of this group would result in growing shares of new labor-force entrants having levels of education lower than those prevailing today; in increased income disparities between blacks and Hispanics, on one hand, and Asians and non-Hispanic whites, on the other; and in increased public expenditures for social and health programs for generations to come.
Improving Schools for African American Students is designed to provide educational leaders with a better understanding of how to recognize the diversity of strengths that Black students bring with them to school and how to use these strengths to improve achievement. The articles contained in this book discuss generic education issues such as policy reform, the importance of high quality teaching, and the improvement of schools from the perspective of the academic achievement of African American students. Part I explores institutional racism in the context of America's public schools and provides suggestions for educational leaders to eliminate harmful policies and practices within educational institutions and settings. Part II discusses the kinds of institutional and instructional changes that are needed to support successful schooling of African American children and youth. Part III focuses on the challenges presented to African American students by the current high stakes testing environment that surrounds standards, assessment, and accountability. A review of the literature on schools that have succeeded in improving achievement for African American students at the elementary, middle, and high school levels with districts moving towards narrowing the achievement gap is included. This text examines a wide variety of policies, programs, practices, and research that will provide valuable insight. The emphasis throughout the book is on the ability of educators to successfully restructure their schools, offer high quality teaching and learning standards for African American students and to make the kinds of changes that will result in high achievement for all students.
Latinos in the United States have fought hard to attain equality, especially in the field of education. This set of books focuses on the fight for equal educational access. The contributors reveal that many Latino children still face decades-old challenges. In addition to such obstacles as cultural conflicts and racism, they also face teachers, curricula, and assessments that are not always respectful to their backgrounds.
Every four years since 2004, the Copenhagen Consensus Center has organized and hosted a high profile thought experiment about how a hypothetical extra $75 billion of development assistance money might best be spent to solve twelve of the major crises facing the world today. Collated in this specially commissioned book, a group of more than 50 experts make their cases for investment, discussing how to combat problems ranging from armed conflicts, corruption and trade barriers, to natural disasters, hunger, education and climate change. For each case, 'Alternative Perspectives' are also included to provide a critique and make other suggestions for investment. In addition, a panel of senior economists, including four Nobel Laureates, rank the attractiveness of each policy proposal in terms of its anticipated cost-benefit ratio. This thought-provoking book opens up debate, encouraging readers to come up with their own rankings and decide which solutions are smarter than others.
Examines trends in the mathematics scores of different racial-ethnic groups over time and analyzes how changes in family, school, and schooling measures help explain changes in the test score gaps. Although there were few positive changes between schools, the within-school experiences of black and Latino students changed for the better compared with white students when measured by student self-reported academic track placement.
Increases in educational attainment benefit the public because more highly educated people tend to pay more in taxes, are less likely to use social support programs, and are less likely to commit crimes. This volume examines the monetary value of these benefits over an individual1s lifetime and how they vary with education level.
The purpose of this dissertation is to demonstrate how states that are undergoing major demographic shifts, such as California and Texas, can continuously monitor the postsecondary educational attainment of Hispanics. To accomplish this, I utilize publicly available data from California Postsecondary Education Commission and Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board to construct Equity Scorecards for California and Texas. I examine data under four perspectives---academic preparation, access, retention and degree attainment, and excellence---and use the Equity Index as the tool for data analysis. The results demonstrate that the greatest inequities for Hispanics are found at the starting point of the educational pipeline: high school graduation and access to four-year institutions. More attention should be given to these crucial points in the pipeline in order to increase the proportion of Hispanics in California and Texas with a baccalaureate degree. I argue that a comprehensive accountability mechanism, such as the Equity Scorecard, with clear state priorities is needed to address these problems. The Equity Scorecard provides a concrete and useful example in assessing higher education systems in providing equitable educational outcomes for Hispanics and serves as a starting point for conversation to address those issues.

Best Books