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With over sixty cases as support, this text presents the philosophy of law as a perpetual series of debates with overlapping lines and cross connections. Using law as a focus to bring into relief many social and political issues of pressing importance in contemporary society, this book encourages readers to think critically and philosophically. Classic Readings and Cases in the Philosophy of Law centers on five major questions: What is law? What, if any, connection must there be between law and morality? When should law be used to restrict the liberty of individuals? To what extent should democratic states permit civil disobedience? What, if anything, justifies the infliction of punishment on those who violate the law? The extensive anthology of cases covers the mundane to the grandest of constitutional issues, including controversial topics like ownership of genetic material, capital punishment, and gay rights. Brief introductions to each case describe the central issue being litigated, the legal reasoning of the justices–both majority and dissenting–the decision of the court, and its philosophical significance.
Intended for upper year university students enrolled in philosophy of law courses. Classic Readings and Canadian Cases in the Philosophy of Law is designed to increase student understanding of the role of law in society, as well as historical and philosophical debates surrounding major legal issues. Dimock strikes a balance between traditional philosophical subjects (i.e. the nature of law, morality, liberty) and practical issues of immediate interest to students (i.e. corporate pollution, sexual assault, hate crimes, pornography) by combining theoretical readings with current Canadian legal cases. The readings showcase experts in each subject area-- both classical and modern, Canadian and international. Pedagogical aids are found throughout the text and include a glossary of legal and philosophical terms, an appendix of relevant sections of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, lists of additional readings, and extensive study questions.
Ideal for undergraduate courses in philosophy of law, this comprehensive anthology examines such topics as the concept of law, the dispute between natural law theorists and legal positivists, the relations between law and morality, criminal responsibility and legal punishment, the rights of the individual against the state, justice and equality, and legal evidence as compared with scientific evidence. The readings have been selected from both philosophy and law journals and include classic texts, contemporary theoretical developments, and well-known recent court cases. The text features extensive introductions that make even the most profound writings accessible to undergraduates.
Philosophy of Law: An Introduction provides an ideal starting point for students of philosophy and law. Setting it clearly against the historical background, Mark Tebbit quickly leads readers into the heart of the philosophical questions that dominate philosophy of law today. He provides an exceptionally wide-ranging overview of the contending theories that have sought to resolve these problems. He does so without assuming prior knowledge either of philosophy or law on the part of the reader. The book is structured in three parts around the key issues and themes in philosophy of law: What is the law? – the major legal theories addressing the question of what we mean by law, including natural law, legal positivism and legal realism. The reach of the law – the various legal theories on the nature and extent of the law’s authority, with regard to obligation and civil disobedience, rights, liberty and privacy. Criminal law – responsibility and mens rea, intention, recklessness and murder, legal defences, insanity and philosophies of punishment. This new third edition has been thoroughly updated to include assessments of important developments in philosophy and law in the early years of the twenty-first century. Revisions include a more detailed analysis of natural law, new chapters on common law and the development of positivism, a reassessment of the Austin–Hart dispute in the light of recent criticism of Hart, a new chapter on the natural law–positivist controversy over Nazi law and legality, and new chapters on criminal law, extending the analysis of the dispute over the viability of the defences of necessity and duress.
This analytical anthology introduces students with little background in either to both law and philosophy using prominent classic political philosophers, legal theorists, and abundant landmark court cases. Legal issues are placed in their historical and philosophical contexts. The book considers critical issues such as civil disobedience, war crimes, and the death penalty. It teaches the basics of international, constitutional, and criminal law and shows how philosophy of law helps makes sense of and unifies the seeming “scraps and fragments” of law. The chapters focus on different areas of law and on different philosophers and philosophies. A classical political philosopher anchors each area of law covered. The anthology includes writings from prominent political philosophers (Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Kant, Mill, Nietzsche, and Rawls), from classical legal theorists (Aquinas, Grotius, Austin, Fuller, Hart, and Dworkin), and from judicial opinions (Justices Blackmun, Brennan, Marshall, Rehnquist, and Scalia).
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