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First published in 1975. This volume presents the documentary evidence for understanding the evolution of China's foreign relations since the inauguration of the People's Republic in 1949. Over seventy documentary extracts cover the years 1949-1947. They include selections from statements and reports, conference resolutions, the speeches of Mao Tse-tung, Chou En-lai and other Chinese leaders, and editorials from People's Daily and Red Flag. Western commentators such as Edgar Snow and Neal Ascherson are also represented, however most of the material is from Chinese sources. Particular attention is given to: · Sino-American relations · The Sino-Soviet rift · The development of Peking's strategy towards Asia, Africa and Western Europe.
This cogent but comprehensive book examines the international relations of the People's Republic of China since its founding in 1949. Noted scholar Robert G. Sutter provides a balanced assessment of the country's recent successes and advances as well as the important legacies and constraints that hamper it, especially in nearby Asia—long the focus of China's foreign policy attention. Advances the PRC has made in other parts of the world focus mainly on commercial interests, limiting its actual impact on world affairs. Sutter shows readers how to use China's rise in nearby Asia as a reliable barometer of how important and effective it actually will become internationally.
This cogent but comprehensive book examines the international relations of the People’s Republic of China since its founding in 1949. Noted scholar Robert G. Sutter provides a balanced assessment of the country’s recent successes and advances as well as the important legacies and constraints that hamper it, especially in nearby Asia—long the focus of China’s foreign policy attention. Sutter demonstrates how Beijing has carefully created an image of a China that follows consistent policies based on morally correct principles, but its record shows repeated episodes of sometime surprising change and frequent use of violence, intimidation, and coercion. China’s leaders, he argues, still fail to manage the desire for productive foreign relations with their aspirations to build Chinese security and sovereignty interests. Image-building efforts condition Chinese public and elite opinion to be extraordinarily sensitive, self-righteous, and often alarmist in dealing with the many disputes China has with its Asian neighbors and the United States. Advances the PRC has made in other parts of the world focus mainly on commercial interests, limiting its actual impact on world affairs. Sutter shows readers how to use China’s rise in nearby Asia as a reliable barometer of how important and effective it actually will become internationally.
Few issues in the relations between China and the West invoke as much passion as human rights. At stake, however, are much more than moral concerns and hurt national feelings. To Washington, the undemocratic nature of the Chinese government makes it ultimately suspect on all issues. To Beijing, the human rights pressure exerted by the West on China seems designed to compromise its legitimacy. As China's economic power grows and its influence on the politics of developing countries continues, an understanding of the place of human rights in China's foreign relations is crucial to the implementation of an effective international human rights agenda. In Human Rights in Chinese Foreign Relations, Ming Wan examines China's relations with the United States, Western Europe, Japan, and the United Nations human rights institutions. Wan shows that, after a decade of persistent external pressure to reform its practices, China still plays human rights diplomacy as traditional power politics and deflects pressure by mobilizing its propaganda machine to neutralize Western criticism, by making compromises that do not threaten core interests, and by offering commercial incentives to important nations to help prevent a unified Western front. Furthermore, at the UN, China has largely succeeded in rallying developing nation members to defeat Western efforts at censure. In turn, it is apparent to Wan that, while the idea of human rights matters in Western policy, it has seldom prevailed over economic considerations or concerns about national security. Western governments have not committed as many policy resources to pressuring Beijing on human rights as to other issues, and the differing degrees of commitment to human rights-related foreign policy explain why Japan, Western Europe, and the United States, in that order, have gradually retreated from confronting China on human rights issues.
Chinese Foreign Policy offers an unprecedented survey of China's foreign relations since 1949. The contributors include leading historians, economists, and political scientists in the field of Chinese studies, as well as noteworthy international relations specialists. The principal purposes of the volume are to assess the variety of sources that give shape to Chinese foreign policy, and to trace four decades of Chinese interaction with the world. Individual chapters include consideration of the historical, perceptual, economic, and political sources of Chinese foreign policy; how the international strategic and technological systems impact on China and vice versa; China's evolving relations with the United States, the former Soviet Union, Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia since the Chinese Communist Party came to power; patterns in China's co-operative and conflictual behaviour; how China negotiates; China's role in the international economy; and the relationship between international relations theory and the study of Chinese foreign policy. Studies of these subjects are retrospective, but they consider various scenarios for the future evolution of China's relations with the world community. Contributors: Wendy Frieman, Steven M. Goldstein, Carol Lee Hamrin, Harry Harding, Lillian Craig Harris, Harold C. Hinton, Samuel S. Kim, Wiliam C. Kirby, Paul H. Kreisberg, Steven I. Levine, Barry Naughton, James N. Rosenau, Madelyn C. Ross, Philip Snow, WilliamT. Tow, Wang Jisi, Allen S. Whiting, Michael B. Yahuda, and the editors.
uncertainties. For many Americans, China's increasing global reach and growing political and economic influence constitute the greatest challenge to U.S. world dominance. As a result, some perceive China's rise as a threat to Americans' core national interests. --

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