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Two sharply contrasting views of China exist today. On the one hand a rising superpower predicted to have the largest economy in the world by mid century, on the other hand a brutal, anachronistic and authoritarian regime, a threat to geo-stability and to the economies of the industrial world. So which China is the real China? Randall Peerenboom addresses this question by exploring China's economy, political and legal system, and most controversially, its recordon civil, political and personal rights in the context of the developing world. Avoiding polemic and relying on empirical evidence, this book seeks to bridge the gap in understanding about China and to create a firmer foundation for mutual trust, while recognising that there are inevitable risks in ashift in global power of this magnitude that will require hard headed pragmatism at times where interests collide.
A systematic and up-to-date account of constitutional developments in sixteen Asian countries, including analysis from a comparative perspective.
This volume analyzes whether China's thirty years of legal reform have taken root in Chinese society by examining how ordinary citizens are using the legal system in contemporary China. It is an interdisciplinary look at law in action and at legal institutions from the bottom up, that is, beginning with those at the ground level that are using and working in the legal system. It explores the emergent Chinese conception of justice - one that seeks to balance Chinese tradition, socialist legacies and the needs of the global market. Given the political dimension of dispute resolution in creating, settling and changing social norms, this volume contributes to a greater understanding of political and social change in China today and of the process of legal reform generally.
Asian Capitalism and the Regulation of Competition explores the implications of Asian forms of capitalism and their regulation of competition for the emerging global competition law regime. Expert contributors from a variety of backgrounds explore the topic through the lenses of formal law, soft law and transnational regulation, and make extensive comparisons with Euro-American and global models. Case studies include Japan, China and Vietnam, and thematic studies include examinations of competition law's relationship with other regulatory terrains such as public law, market culture, regulatory geography and transnational production networks.
This book examines the development model that has driven China's economic success and looks at how it differs from the Washington Consensus. China’s Development Model (CDM) is examined with a view to answering a central question: given China’s peculiar matrix of a socialist party-state juxtaposed with economic internationalization and marketization, what are the underlying dynamics and the distinctive features of the economic and political/legal/social dimensions of the CDM, and how do we properly characterize their interrelations? The chapters further analyse to what extent and under what circumstances is China's development model sustainable, and to what degree is it readily applicable to other developing countries. Based on their findings in this volume, the authors conclude that the defining feature of the CDM’s economic dimension is "Janus-faced state-led growth," and the political/legal/social dimension of the CDM is best characterized as "adaptive post-totalitarianism." The contributors illustrate that the CDM’s parameters are shown to be much less sustainable than the CDM’s outcome in developmental performance and the extent to which the CDM can be applied to other late-developers is subject to more qualifications than its sustainability.
Beijing presents a clear and gathering threat to Washington - but not for the reasons you think. China's challenge to the West stems from its transformative brand of capitalism and an entirely different conception of the international community. Taking us on a whirlwind tour of China in the world - from dictators in Africa to oligarchs in Southeast Asia to South American strongmen - Halper demonstrates that China's illiberal vision is rapidly replacing that of the so-called Washington Consensus. Instead of promoting democracy through economic aid, as does the West, China offers no-strings-attached gifts and loans, a policy designed to build a new Beijing Consensus. The autonomy China offers, together with the appeal of its illiberal capitalism, have become the dual engines for the diffusion of power away from the West. The Beijing Consensus is the one book to read to understand this new Great Game in all its complexity.
Who is running China? Where does real power lie? In Party Time, Rowan Callick goes behind the scenes of reveal the workings of the county's political elite. This is a vivid, ground-breaking book about the world's most powerful institutions: the Chinese Communist Party. Nearly a century after its underground beginnings in a Shanghai schoolroom, the party today exerts remarkable control. Business deals require party approval. University courses reflect party doctrine. Party families amass incredible wealth while other enterprises are squeezed out. The party itself has over 80 million members, who range from lowly functionaries to unapproachable princelings. Why and how do people join the party? Who are its up-and-coming leaders, how are they educated and what visions do they have for China's future? Callick show that this is a pivotal time for the party. Far from mellowing, the new leadership is as focused as ever on strengthening its role and silencing dissent. But how prepared is it for the challenges it now faces, and what will its success or failure mean for China and the world? 'Party Time is a remarkable portrait of China today. Rowan Callick writes with a twofold strength: 1) the outstanding quality of his information drawn mostly from the source: the Chinese people themselves (officials and dissenters, millionaires and paupers, artists, students, country people, urbanites, old and young) and 2) a rare ability not to draw conclusions, but to raise the questions that truly matter, with a subtle mixture of clear-sightedness, awe and human compassion.' - Simon Leys

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