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Discusses the artistic culture of woodcarving, with step-by-step directions for carving Native American designs
Identifies and summarizes thousands of books, article, exhibition catalogues, government publications, and theses published in many countries and in several languages from the early nineteenth century to 1981.
The shores of the Pacific North-west hum with a profound energy. The moist Pacific air masses and the plankton-rich ocean currents drive one of the world's most diverse ecosystems. Beneath the roiling waters of the shallows and reefs, forests of swaying kelp host hundreds of species of marine animals. On shore, the arching canopy of the great rainforest shelters foraging bears, wolves, cougars, elk and deer, while nesting seabirds rest in the mossy branches of 1000-year-old giant spruce, cedar, hemlock and fir. Thousands of rivers and creeks nurture steelhead trout and the five species of Pacific salmon -- Chinook, Coho, Sockeye, Chum and Pink. Ancient seabeds, thrust upward during tectonic collisions, evidence the relentless force of erosion. High above the shore, the jagged mountain peaks and polished rock faces are crowned in snow and ice.
Through the mists of Alaska's rain forest, totem poles have stood watch for untold generations. Imbued with mystery to outsider eyes, the fierce, carved symbols silently spoke of territories, legends, memorials, and paid debts. Today many of these cultural icons are preserved for the public to enjoy in heritage parks and historical centers through southeast Alaska. And, after nearly a century of repression, totem carving among Alaska's Tlingit, Haida, Tsimshian peoples is flourishing again. In this newly revised edition of Alaska's Totem Poles, readers learn about the history and use of totems, clan crests, symbolism, and much more. A special section describes where to go to view totems. And foreword writer David A. Boxley offers the unique perspective of a Native Alaskan carver who has been a leader in the renaissance. Author Pat Kramer traveled throughout the homelands of the Totem People – along Alaska's Panhandle, the coast of British Columbia, and into the Northwest - meeting the people, learning their stores, and researching and photographing totem poles. Pat is also a tour director and the author and photographer of several other books, including Vancouver, Gardens of British Columbia, and Totem Poles, a guidebook to Western Canada's totems. Foreword writer David Boxley, the first Alaskan Tsimshian to achieve national prominence, is a renown totem pole carver, having carved sixty-five poles in the last twenty-six years. He has been deeply involved in the rebirth of Tsimshian culture through organizing and hosting Potlatches in Alaska and Washington.
In the early decades of the twentieth century, the visual arts were considered central to the formation of a distinct national identity, and the Group of Seven's landscapes became part of a larger program to unify the nation and assert its uniqueness. This book traces the development of this program and illuminates its conflicted history. Leslie Dawn problematizes conventional perceptions of the Group as a national school and underscores the contradictions inherent in international exhibitions showing unpeopled landscapes alongside Northwest Coast Native arts and the "Indian" paintings of Langdon Kihn and Emily Carr. Dawn examines how this dichotomy forced a re-evaluation of the place of First Nations in both Canadian art and nationalism.
Magnificent and haunting, the tall cedar sculptures called totem poles have become a distinctive symbol of the native people of the Northwest Coast. The powerful carvings of the vital and extraordinary beings such as Sea Bear, Thunderbird and Cedar Man are impressive and intriguing. In Looking at Totem Poles, Hilary Stewart describes the various types of poles, their purpose, and how they were carved and raised. She also identifies and explains frequently depicted figures and objects. Each pole, shown in a beautifully detailed drawing, is accompanied by a text that points out the crests, figures and objects carved on it. Historical and cultural background are given, legends are recounted and often the carver’s comments or anecdotes enrich the pole’s story. Photographs put some of the poles into context or show their carving and raising.
Alaska has long been a nurturing home for artists, with its stunning natural beauty, rich cultural life, and unique communities. In recent years, artists in Alaska have had an additional source of support: the awarding of annual grants to craftsmen, musicians, performers, visual artists, and writers by the Rasmuson Foundation. Creative Alaska profiles the award winners from 2004 to 2013 in three categories: Distinguished Artists, Fellowships, and Project Awards. Richly illustrated accounts of each of the artists and their work illuminate the challenges and opportunities of the artistic life in Alaska and the powerful impact of the Rasmuson Foundation's support.

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