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Interpreting has been a neglected area since the late 1970s. Sylvie Lambert and Barbara Moser-Mercer have attempted to give a new impulse to academic research in print with this collection of 30 articles discussing various aspects of interpreting grouped in 3 sections: I. Pedagogical issues, II. Simultaneous interpretation, III. Neuropsychological research.Being a professional interpreter may not be sufficient to explain what interpretation is all about and how it should be practised and taught. The purpose of this collection of reports on non-arbitrary, empirical research of simultaneous and sign-language interpretation, designed to bridge the gap between vocational and scientific aspects of an interpreter s skills, is to show that the study of conference interpretation, by way of scientific experimental methods, as tedious and speculative as they may often appear, is bound to contribute significantly to general knowledge in this field and have tangible and practical repercussions. The contributors are specialists from all over the world. Introduction by Barbara Moser-Mercer.
The project—the longest total suspension bridge in the world—would span the Starits of Mackinac where winds exceed eighty miles an hour and ice windrows reach a height of forty feet. It would connect two largely rural communities with a combined population of less than four thousand and would require the largest bond issue ever proposed for the construction of a bridge. Little wonder that some Wall Street investors labeled the proposition as ludicrous. Nonetheless, the Mackinac Bridge became a reality.
Funeral rites help people to cope with their loss and express their religious needs. Even in a secularised society such as that in the Netherlands large groups of people still fall back on ecclesiastic rites when a loved one dies. But how does one explain that there are more people participating in church funerals than people who assign religion a focal place in their lives? How do present-day funeral-goers regard the rites in which they participate? Does the rite actually help them to bridge the gaps left by the deceased? This study considers such questions from the angle of ritual and liturgical studies by way of empirical research into perceptions of present-day church funerals in the Netherlands.
A path-breaking collaboration between an Israeli arms control expert and a Jordanian policy advisor, this concise book offers a frank assessment of Arab and Israeli perceptions of their security problems. Building on the bilateral and multilateral peace process, the authors propose a set of measures to increase trust between the two sides and break out of the security dilemma in which a move by one side to strengthen itself provokes the other side to do the same.
This book begins with a simple question: Why haven't historians and musicologists been talking to one another? Historians frequently look to all aspects of human activity, including music, in order to better understand the past. Musicologists inquire into the social, cultural, and historical contexts of musical works and musical practices to develop theories about the meanings of compositions and the significance of musical creation. Both disciplines examine how people represent their experiences. This collection of original essays, the first of its kind, argues that the conversation between scholars in the two fields can become richer and more mutually informing. The volume features an eloquent personal essay by historian Lawrence W. Levine, whose work has inspired a whole generation of scholars working on African American music in American history. The first six essays address widely different aspects of musical culture and history ranging from women and popular song during the French Revolution to nineteenth-century music publishing in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Two additional essays by scholars outside of musicology and history represent a new kind of disciplinary bridging by using the methods of cultural studies to look at cross-dressing in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century opera and blues responses to lynching in the New South. The last four essays offer models for collaborative, multidisciplinary research with a special emphasis on popular music. Jeffrey H. Jackson, Memphis, Tennessee, is assistant professor of history at Rhodes College. He is the author of Making Jazz French: Music and Modern Life in Interwar Paris. Stanley C. Pelkey, Portage, Michigan, is assistant professor of music at Western Michigan University. He is a member of the College Music Society, and his work has appeared in music-related periodicals.

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