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This book provides people with borderline personality disorder and their families and friends with a user friendly but authoritative guide to the condition. The book not only includes information about the disorder and how it is diagnosed, but also looks in depth at treatment and recovery strategies.
Kiera Van Gelder's first suicide attempt at the age of twelve marked the onset of her struggles with drug addiction, depression, post-traumatic stress, self-harm, and chaotic romantic relationships-all of which eventually led to doctors' belated diagnosis of borderline personality disorder twenty years later. The Buddha and the Borderline is a window into this mysterious and debilitating condition, an unblinking portrayal of one woman's fight against the emotional devastation of borderline personality disorder. This haunting, intimate memoir chronicles both the devastating period that led to Kiera's eventual diagnosis and her inspirational recovery through therapy, Buddhist spirituality, and a few online dates gone wrong. Kiera's story sheds light on the private struggle to transform suffering into compassion for herself and others, and is essential reading for all seeking to understand what it truly means to recover and reclaim the desire to live.
"A superb, up-to-date feminist analysis of the borderline condition. . . . Characterized by stereotypically feminine qualities, such as poor interpersonal boundaries and an unstable sense of self, borderline diagnosis has been questioned by many as a veiled replacement of the hysteria diagnosis. . . . Wirth-Cauchon includes narratives from women exhibiting the theoretical underpinnings of the borderline diagnosis. . . . The author is rigorous in her analysis, and mainstream academics and diagnosticians should take note lest they create yet another label that disregards the contradictory and conflicting expectations experienced by so many women. Includes an excellent bibliography and a wealth of good reference. Highly recommended."-Choice "This book contributes to a rich, feminist interdisciplinary theoretical understanding of women's psychological distress, and represents an excellent companion volume to Dana Becker's book titled Through the Looking Glass."-Psychology of Women Quarterly "Wonderfully written. . . . [The] argument proceeds with an impeccable and transparent logic, the writing is sophisticated, evocative, even inspired. This work should have enormous appeal."- Kenneth Gergen, author of Realities and Relationships "Impressive in its synthesis of many different ideas . . . both clinicians and people diagnosed with BPD may find much of value in Wirth-Cauchon's thoughtful and provoking analysis."-Metapsychology At the beginning of the twentieth century, "hysteria" as a medical or psychiatric diagnosis was primarily applied to women. In fact, the term itself comes from the Greek, meaning "wandering womb." We have since learned that this diagnosis had evolved from certain assumptions about women's social roles and mental characteristics, and is no longer in use. The modern equivalent of hysteria, however, may be borderline personality disorder, defined as "a pervasive pattern of instability of self-image, interpersonal relationships, and mood, beginning in early adulthood and present in a variety of contexts." This diagnosis is applied to women so much more often than to men that feminists have begun to raise important questions about the social, cultural, and even the medical assumptions underlying this "illness." Women are said to be "unstable" when they may be trying to reconcile often contradictory and conflicting social expectations. In Women and Borderline Personality Disorder, Janet Wirth-Cauchon presents a feminist cultural analysis of the notions of "unstable" selfhood found in case narratives of women diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. This exploration of contemporary post-Freudian psychoanalytic notions of the self as they apply to women's identity conflicts is an important contribution to the literature on social constructions of mental illness in women and feminist critiques of psychiatry in general. Janet Wirth-Cauchon is an associate professor of sociology at Drake University.
Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a serious personality disorder marked by extreme, fluctuating emotions, black-and-white thinking, problems with interpersonal relationships, and in extreme cases, self-harm. If you have recently been diagnosed with BPD, you likely have many questions. What treatment options are available? How do you tell your friends and loved ones? And what are the common side-effects of medication? A diagnosis of BPD can definitely change your life, but it can also be a catalyst for personal transformation and growth. In Borderline Personality Disorder: A Guide for the Newly Diagnosed, two renowned experts on BPD present an easy-to-read introduction to BPD for those who have recently been diagnosed. Readers will learn the most common complications of the illness, the most effective treatments available, and practical strategies for staying on the path to recovery. This book is a part of New Harbinger Publication’s Guides for the Newly Diagnosed series. The series was created to help people who have recently been diagnosed with a mental health condition. Our goal is to offer user-friendly resources that provide answers to common questions readers may have after receiving a diagnosis, as well as evidence-based strategies to help them cope with and manage their condition, so that they can get back to living a more balanced life. Visit www.newharbinger.com for more books in this series.
Affecting more than five million people in the United States, borderline personality disorder, also called emotional regulation disorder, has become more common than Alzheimer's, and nearly that of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia combined. Marked by bouts of violence and anger coupled with desperate and fixated love, this disorder is just now being recognized as a true mental illness. The Everything Guide to Borderline Personality Disorder is the professional yet compassionate guide that readers need to explore and understand the tumultuous world of BPD, offering information on: Experiences, trauma, and heredity as causes of BPD Warning signs and red flags from an early age Monitoring and recognizing extreme symptoms Different treatment options and therapies Maintaining safety in a relationship that involves BPD Featuring the latest therapy information on mindfulness meditation and behavioral relaxation, The Everything Guide to Borderline Personality Disorder is the comprehensive resource for families, spouses, and friends dealing with this psychological epidemic.
Over the past two decades considerable progress has been made in developing specialist psychosocial treatments for borderline personality disorder (BPD), yet the majority of people with BPD receive treatment within generalist mental health services, rather than specialist treatment centres. This is a book for general mental health professionals who treat people with borderline personality disorder (BPD). It offers practical guidance on how to help people with BPD with advice based on research evidence. After a discussion of the symptoms of BPD, the authors review all the generalist treatment interventions that have resulted in good outcomes in randomised controlled trials, when compared with specialist treatments, and summarise the effective components of these interventions. The treatment strategies are organised into a structured approach called Structured Clinical Management (SCM), which can be delivered by general mental health professionals without extensive additional training. The heart of the book outlines the principles underpinning SCM and offers a step-by-step guide to the clinical intervention. Practitioners can learn the interventions easily and develop more confidence in treating people with BPD. In addition, a chapter is devoted to how to help families - an issue commonly neglected when treating patients with BPD. Finally the authors discuss the top 10 strategies for delivering treatment and outline how the general mental health clinician can deliver these strategies competently.
Eating Disorders: The Facts is a comprehensive and accessible guide to the major eating disorders namely anorexia nervosa, anorexia nervosa not for weight or shape, exercise disorder, bulimia nervosa, purging disorder, rumination disorder, binge eating disorder and atypical. Sympathetically and clearly written, this guide considers why eating disorders occur, and then looks at each in turn, describing the eating behaviours, diagnosis, and treatments available.The opening chapters tackle adolescent eating behaviours and infertility, pregnancy and the postpartum period. Case histories and patient perspectives provide insights into the mind of the eating disorder sufferer, making it easier for patients and their families to relate to the topics discussed. Revised and updated new topics include contribution of epigenetics (in utero contribution), attachment in perinatal and early years, and the negative and positive impact of the internet and social media. Eating Disorders: The Facts provides an authoritative resource on eating disorders that will prove valuable for sufferers and their families.

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