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When Johan Booysen hears that the new Provincial Police Chief takes backhanders from a Durban businessman, he decides to give her the benefit of the doubt. But the evidence becomes impossible to ignore and he soon gets dragged down the corridors of power and politics into a web of intrigue, deceit and betrayal that, at times, he has trouble making sense of. Only when he is arrested, handcuffed and tossed into a cell does Booysen realise just how ruthless those opposed to him are - an opposition he comes to call the 'cabal' - and whom he believes have more blood on their hands than the so-called Cato Manor Death Squad with which he is closely associated. Blood on their Hands traces Johan Booysen's life and career - from patrolling the streets of Amanzimtoti in the 1970s to his rise in 2010 to major general and head of KZN's Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation unit, the Hawks. But his tenure is short-lived. When Booysen decides to take on those so determined to be rid of him, each legal battle he wins is met by hostility and further efforts to shut him out of the of the criminal justice system. But capitulating is not in his DNA... -- page 4 of cover.
The trade in oil, gas, gems, metals and rare earth minerals wreaks havoc in Africa. During the years when Brazil, India, China and the other “emerging markets” have transformed their economies, Africa's resource states remained tethered to the bottom of the industrial supply chain. While Africa accounts for about 30 per cent of the world's reserves of hydrocarbons and minerals and 14 per cent of the world's population, its share of global manufacturing stood in 2011 exactly where it stood in 2000: at 1 percent. In his first book, The Looting Machine, Tom Burgis exposes the truth about the African development miracle: for the resource states, it's a mirage. The oil, copper, diamonds, gold and coltan deposits attract a global network of traders, bankers, corporate extractors and investors who combine with venal political cabals to loot the states' value. And the vagaries of resource-dependent economies could pitch Africa's new middle class back into destitution just as quickly as they climbed out of it. The ground beneath their feet is as precarious as a Congolese mine shaft; their prosperity could spill away like crude from a busted pipeline. This catastrophic social disintegration is not merely a continuation of Africa's past as a colonial victim. The looting now is accelerating as never before. As global demand for Africa's resources rises, a handful of Africans are becoming legitimately rich but the vast majority, like the continent as a whole, is being fleeced. Outsiders tend to think of Africa as a great drain of philanthropy. But look more closely at the resource industry and the relationship between Africa and the rest of the world looks rather different. In 2010, fuel and mineral exports from Africa were worth 333 billion, more than seven times the value of the aid that went in the opposite direction. But who received the money? For every Frenchwoman who dies in childbirth, 100 die in Niger alone, the former French colony whose uranium fuels France's nuclear reactors. In petro-states like Angola three-quarters of government revenue comes from oil. The government is not funded by the people, and as result it is not beholden to them. A score of African countries whose economies depend on resources are rentier states; their people are largely serfs. The resource curse is not merely some unfortunate economic phenomenon, the product of an intangible force. What is happening in Africa's resource states is systematic looting. Like its victims, its beneficiaries have names.
The story of a rogue unit operating within the South African Revenue Service (SARS) became entrenchedin the public mind following a succession of sensational reports published by the Sunday Times in 2014.The unit, the reports claimed, had carried out a series of illegal spook operations: they had spied onPresident Jacob Zuma, run a brothel, illegally bought spy ware and entered into unlawful tax settlements. In a plot of Machiavellian proportions, head of the elite crime‐busting unit Johann van Loggerenberg andmany of SARSs top management were forced to resign. Van Loggerenbergs select team of investigators,with their impeccable track record of busting high‐level financial fraudsters and nailing tax criminals, lostnot only their careers but also their reputations. Now, in this extraordinary account, they finally get to put the record straight and the rumours to rest:there was no rogue unit. The public had been deceived, seemingly by powers conspiring to capture SARSfor their own ends.Shooting down the allegations he has faced one by one, Van Loggerenberg tells the story of what reallyhappened inside SARS, revealing details of some of the units actual investigations.
Helen Zille’s long-awaited autobiography is one of the most fascinating political stories of our time. Zille takes the reader back to her humble family origins, her struggle with anorexia as a young woman, her early career as a journalist for the Rand Daily Mail, and her involvement with the End Conscription Campaign and the Black Sash. She documents her early days in the Democratic Party and the Democratic Alliance, at a time when the party was locked in a no-holds-barred factional conflict. And she chronicles the intense political battles to become mayor of Cape Town, leader of the DA and premier of the Western Cape, in the face of dirty tricks from the ANC and infighting within her own party. This is a story about political intrigue and treachery, floor-crossing and unlikely coalitions, phone tapping and intimidation, false criminal charges and judicial commissions. It documents Zille’s courageous fight against corruption and state capture and her efforts to realign politics and entrench accountability. And it describes a mother’s battle to raise children in the pressured world of South African politics. This book is as frank, honest and unflinching as Helen Zille herself, and will appeal to anyone interested in the story of South African politics over the past fifty years.
Kasinomics is a book as eclectic, mysterious and colourful as the places and people it explores. eKasi, the lokasie, the South African township, once an apartheid ghetto, is today an amazingly transformed place. This township today is an eclectic mix of mansions, shacks, spaza shops, rocking taverns, hawkers, taxis and hot wheels. In this kasi there are vibrant businesses, energetic people, a tightly networked social community and abundant hope. That is not to say there isn't extreme poverty, suffering and dissatisfaction, particularly on the peripheries in the huge shack settlements, but to paint the place as a slum is a massive mistake. Kasinomics attempts to cast a light on the invisible matrix at the heart of South Africa's informal economies and the people who live in them. Living and doing business in African marketplaces requires an ethos uniquely suited to the informal, to the invisible, to the intangible. Kasinomics will take you down those rural pathways, weave between claustrophobic mazes of shacks, browse a muti market, visit a spirit returning ceremony and save money with gogo in a stokvel among many more people and places. After almost twenty years of focusing on marketing to the informal sector, GG Alcock, CEO of specialist marketing company Minanawe, showcases a number of groundbreaking and very successful case studies in this invisible informal world. His vivid anecdotes and life experiences and how they link to understanding and inspiration for business ideas will make you gasp, laugh and shake your head in wonder.
Bloody crimes of passion, political assassinations, sinister poisonings, investment fraud and mass mining disasters ... Dr David Klatzow has seen it all. During his extraordinary twenty-six-year career as South Africa’s foremost independent forensic scientist, he has investigated countless high-profile and notorious cases. Steeped in Blood provides gripping accounts of dozens of these matters, including the infamous deaths of Brett Kebble and Inge Lotz, the Helderberg aeroplane crash and the frustrating investigations of the brutal apartheid years. From the Gugulethu Seven and Trojan Horse massacres to the assassination of David Webster, Klatzow’s investigations reveal his fierce determination to unveil the truth in spite of overwhelming state obstructions, police bungling and cover-ups. Unfazed by controversy and unwilling to accept no for an answer, Klatzow’s tenacity, fearlessness and forensic know-how are used to brilliant effect in these fascinating cases. This book exposes a demanding and sinister world where the rewards are equalled only by the frustrations, and where the truth is always elusive. But the truth is out there, and David Klatzow will find it.

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