Download Free Blended Learning Research Perspectives Volume 2 Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Blended Learning Research Perspectives Volume 2 and write the review.

Blended learning, which combines the strength of face-to-face and technology-enhanced learning, is increasingly being seen as one of the most important vehicles for education reform today. Blended learning allows both teacher and learner access to radically increased possibilities for understanding how we transmit and receive information, how we interact with others in educational settings, how we build knowledge, and how we assess what we have taught or learned. Blended Learning: Research Perspectives, Volume 2 provides readers with the most current, in-depth collection of research perspectives on this vital subject, addressing institutional issues, design and adoption issues, and learning issues, as well as an informed meditation on future trends and research in the field. As governments, foundations, schools, and colleges move forward with plans and investments for vast increases in blended learning environments, a new examination of the existing research on the topic is essential reading for all those involved in this educational transformation.
Conducting Research in Online and Blended Learning Environments examines various perspectives, issues, and methods for conducting research in online and blended learning environments. The book provides in-depth examinations of the perspectives and issues that anyone considering research in online or blended learning will find insightful as they plan their own inquiries. Grounded in educational research theory, this is invaluable to both the serious researcher as well as the occasional evaluator. Conducting Research in Online and Blended Learning Environments provides comprehensive, useful information on research paradigms, methodologies, and methods that should be considered in designing and conducting studies in this area. Examples of the most respected research in the field enhance each chapter’s presentation.
While Active Learning Classrooms, or ALCs, offer rich new environments for learning, they present many new challenges to faculty because, among other things, they eliminate the room's central focal point and disrupt the conventional seating plan to which faculty and students have become accustomed. The importance of learning how to use these classrooms well and to capitalize on their special features is paramount. The potential they represent can be realized only when they facilitate improved learning outcomes and engage students in the learning process in a manner different from traditional classrooms and lecture halls. This book provides an introduction to ALCs, briefly covering their history and then synthesizing the research on these spaces to provide faculty with empirically based, practical guidance on how to use these unfamiliar spaces effectively. Among the questions this book addresses are: * How can instructors mitigate the apparent lack of a central focal point in the space? * What types of learning activities work well in the ALCs and take advantage of the affordances of the room? * How can teachers address familiar classroom-management challenges in these unfamiliar spaces? * If assessment and rapid feedback are critical in active learning, how do they work in a room filled with circular tables and no central focus point? * How do instructors balance group learning with the needs of the larger class? * How can students be held accountable when many will necessarily have their backs facing the instructor? * How can instructors evaluate the effectiveness of their teaching in these spaces? This book is intended for faculty preparing to teach in or already working in this new classroom environment; for administrators planning to create ALCs or experimenting with provisionally designed rooms; and for faculty developers helping teachers transition to using these new spaces.
Schedule constraints and other complicating factors can make face-to-face educational methods inadequate to the needs of learners. Thus, blended learning has emerged as a compromise that reconciles the need for high-tech and high-touch learning and teaching interactions. Transcultural Blended Learning and Teaching in Postsecondary Education educates readers across nations and cultures and strengthens their understanding of theories, models, research, applications, best practices, and emerging issues related to blended learning and teaching through a holistic and transcultural perspective. This research volume serves as a valued resource for faculty, administrators, and leaders in postsecondary institutions to plan, develop, implement, and evaluate blended learning programs and courses. It also provides researchers with the latest research in transcultural blended learning and teaching theories, findings, best practices, and emerging trends.
The Perils and Promise of Blending Online and Face-to-Face Instruction in Higher Education Jason Allen Snart Hybrid learning could be the new century's educational game changer. Combining online with face-to-face instruction, hybrid learning promises a best-of-both-worlds solution to higher education's acute problems of student retention, success, and engagement. Yet, in the absence of adequate faculty care and institutional support, hybrid learning can aggravate the very problems it is meant to address. --
This comprehensive resource highlights the most recent practices and trends in blended learning from a global perspective and provides targeted information for specific blended learning situations. You'll find examples of learning options that combine face-to-face instruction with online learning in the workplace, more formal academic settings, and the military. Across these environments, the book focuses on real-world practices and includes contributors from a broad range of fields including trainers, consultants, professors, university presidents, distance-learning center directors, learning strategists and evangelists, general managers of learning, CEOs, chancellors, deans, and directors of global talent and organizational development. This diversity and breadth will help you understand the wide range of possibilities available when designing blended learning environments. Order your copy today!
Public higher education in the postwar era was a key economic and social driver in American life, making college available to millions of working men and women. Since the 1980s, however, government austerity policies and politics have severely reduced public investment in higher education, exacerbating inequality among poor and working-class students of color, as well as part-time faculty. In Austerity Blues, Michael Fabricant and Stephen Brier examine these devastating fiscal retrenchments nationally, focusing closely on New York and California, both of which were leaders in the historic expansion of public higher education in the postwar years and now are at the forefront of austerity measures. Fabricant and Brier describe the extraordinary growth of public higher education after 1945, thanks largely to state investment, the alternative intellectual and political traditions that defined the 1960s, and the social and economic forces that produced austerity policies and inequality beginning in the late 1970s and 1980s. A provocative indictment of the negative impact neoliberal policies have visited on the public university, especially the growth of class, racial, and gender inequalities, Austerity Blues also analyzes the many changes currently sweeping public higher education, including the growing use of educational technology, online learning, and privatization, while exploring how these developments hurt students and teachers. In its final section, the book offers examples of oppositional and emancipatory struggles and practices that can help reimagine public higher education in the future. The ways in which factors as diverse as online learning, privatization, and disinvestment cohere into a single powerful force driving deepening inequality is the central theme of the book. Incorporating the differing perspectives of students, faculty members, and administrators, the book reveals how public education has been redefined as a private benefit, often outsourced to for-profit vendors who "sell" education back to indebted undergraduates. Over the past twenty years, tuition and related student debt have climbed precipitously and degree completion rates have dropped. Not only has this new austerity threatened public universities’ ability to educate students, Fabricant and Brier argue, but it also threatens to undermine the very meaning and purpose of public higher education in offering poor and working-class students access to a quality education in a democracy. Synthesizing historical sources, social science research, and contemporary reportage, Austerity Blues will be of interest to readers concerned about rising inequality and the decline of public higher education.

Best Books