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Published to glowing praise in 1990, Science for All Americans defined the science-literate American--describing the knowledge, skills, and attitudes all students should retain from their learning experience--and offered a series of recommendations for reforming our system of education in science, mathematics, and technology. Benchmarks for Science Literacy takes this one step further. Created in close consultation with a cross-section of American teachers, administrators, and scientists, Benchmarks elaborates on the recommendations to provide guidelines for what all students should know and be able to do in science, mathematics, and technology by the end of grades 2, 5, 8, and 12. These grade levels offer reasonable checkpoints for student progress toward science literacy, but do not suggest a rigid formula for teaching. Benchmarks is not a proposed curriculum, nor is it a plan for one: it is a tool educators can use as they design curricula that fit their student's needs and meet the goals first outlined in Science for All Americans. Far from pressing for a single educational program, Project 2061 advocates a reform strategy that will lead to more curriculum diversity than is common today. IBenchmarks emerged from the work of six diverse school-district teams who were asked to rethink the K-12 curriculum and outline alternative ways of achieving science literacy for all students. These teams based their work on published research and the continuing advice of prominent educators, as well as their own teaching experience. Focusing on the understanding and interconnection of key concepts rather than rote memorization of terms and isolated facts, Benchmarks advocates building a lasting understanding of science and related fields. In a culture increasingly pervaded by science, mathematics, and technology, science literacy require habits of mind that will enable citizens to understand the world around them, make some sense of new technologies as they emerge and grow, and deal sensibly with problems that involve evidence, numbers, patterns, logical arguments, and technology--as well as the relationship of these disciplines to the arts, humanities, and vocational sciences--making science literacy relevant to all students, regardless of their career paths. If Americans are to participate in a world shaped by modern science and mathematics, a world where technological know-how will offer the keys to economic and political stability in the twenty-first century, education in these areas must become one of the nation's highest priorities. Together with Science for All Americans, Benchmarks for Science Literacy offers a bold new agenda for the future of science education in this country, one that is certain to prepare our children for life in the twenty-first century.
When Benchmarks for Science Literacy was first published, Bruce Alberts, president of the National Academy of Sciences praised it as "another milestone in the long standing effort of Project 2061 to improve the teaching and learning of science for all Americans." Now, the monumentalachievement of Benchmarks for Science Literacy is available in a computer disk format for use on IBM-compatible personal computers in MS-DOS. This superb science learning tool enables users to browse, assemble, and print benchmarks in various formats. Users can also review conceptual "strands"--anew tool on the electronic version--that provides sequences of benchmarks that students should progress through on the way toward a specific science-literacy goal. In addition, teachers can brainstorm about how to coordinate seemingly unrelated benchmarks by using "benchmark roulette," a functionwhich creates a random sample of six benchmarks, at two grade levels, that can be used as a basis for discussion. Benchmarks for Science Literacy on Disk greatly enhances the capablities of its companion book, alllowing teachers to tailor searches that are relevant to the grades and subjects they teach. Both quick and easy to use, this extraordinary program allows instant reference access to the entirespectrum of teaching and learning possiblities available with Benchmarks. Focusing on the understanding and interconnection of key concepts rather than rote memorization of terms and isolated facts, Benchmarks advocates building a lasting knowledge of science and related fields. In a culture increasingly pervaded by science, mathematics, and technology, science literacyrequires habits of mind that will enable citizens to understand the world around them, make sense of new technologies as they emerge and grow, and deal sensibly with problems that involve evidence, numbers, patterns, logical arguements, and technology--as well as the relationship of thesedisciplines to the arts, humanities, and vocational studies--making science literacy relevant to all students, regardless of the career path they may choose. Together, Science for All Americans, Benchmarks for Science Literacy, and Benchmarks for Science Literacy on Disk offer a bold new agenda for the future of science in this country, one that is certain to prepare our children for the challenges they will face in the future. Hardware and Software requirements: IBM or compatible PC, 8086, 286, or better, with hard drive. 4 MB free space on hard disk. 2 MB free RAM. MS-DOS 4.0 or higher and 3.5" drive. Mouse and color monitor preferable. Specifications: The package contains one 3.5" high density diskette and a thirty-six page user manual.
In order to compete in the modern world, any society today must rank education in science, mathematics, and technology as one of its highest priorities. It's a sad but true fact, however, that most Americans are not scientifically literate. International studies of educational performance reveal that U.S. students consistently rank near the bottom in science and mathematics. The latest study of the National Assessment of Educational Progress has found that despite some small gains recently, the average performance of seventeen-year-olds in 1986 remained substantially lower than it had been in 1969. As the world approaches the twenty-first century, American schools-- when it comes to the advancement of scientific knowledge-- seem to be stuck in the Victorian age. In Science for All Americans, F. James Rutherford and Andrew Ahlgren brilliantly tackle this devastating problem. Based on Project 2061, a scientific literacy initiative sponsored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, this wide-ranging, important volume explores what constitutes scientific literacy in a modern society; the knowledge, skills, and attitudes all students should acquire from their total school experience from kindergarten through high school; and what steps this country must take to begin reforming its system of education in science, mathematics, and technology. Science for All Americans describes the scientifically literate person as one who knows that science, mathematics, and technology are interdependent enterprises with strengths and limitations; who understands key concepts and principles of science; who recognizes both the diversity and unity of the natural world; and who uses scientific knowledge and scientific ways of thinking for personal and social purposes. Its recommendations for educational reform downplay traditional subject categories and instead highlight the connections between them. It also emphasizes ideas and thinking skills over the memorization of specialized vocabulary. For instance, basic scientific literacy means knowing that the chief function of living cells is assembling protein molecules according to the instructions coded in DNA molecules, but does not mean necessarily knowing the terms "ribosome" or "deoxyribonucleic acid." Science, mathematics, and technology will be at the center of the radical changes in the nature of human existence that will occur during the next life span; therefore, preparing today's children for tomorrow's world must entail a solid education in these areas. Science for All Americans will help pave the way for the necessary reforms in America's schools.
The call for science curriculum reform has been made over and over again for much of the twentieth century. Arguments have been made that the content of the curriculum is not appropriate for meeting the individual and social needs of people living in the modern world; that the curriculum has become overstuffed with topics and does not serve students especially well; and above all, that the curriculum does not generate the student learning it is expected to produce. The latest volume in a continuing series of publications from the AAAS designed to reform science education, Designs for Science Literacy presupposes that curriculum reform must be considerably more extensive and fundamental than the tinkering with individual courses and subjects that has been going on for decades. Designs deals with the critical issues involved in assembling sound instructional materials into a new, coherent K-12 whole. The book pays special attention to the need to link science-oriented studies to the arts and humanities, and also proposes how to align the curriculum with an established set of learning goals while preserving the American tradition of local responsibility for the curriculum itself. If fundamental curriculum reform is ever to occur, a new process for creating alternatives will have to be developed. Designs for Science Literacy provides the groundwork for such a process.
An oversized book with ambitious goals: That's the Atlas of Science Literacy. Asking -- then answering -- such vital questions as: -- What should students learn? -- When should they learn it -- and in what order? -- How does each strand of knowledge connect to other vital threads?This new educational tool from AAAS's Project 2061 graphically depicts connections among the learning goals established in Benchmarks for Science Literacy and Science for All Americans. The Atlas is a collection of 50 linked maps that show exactly how students from kindergarten through 12th grade can expand their understanding and skills toward specific science-literacy goals. But the maps don't just show the sequence of Benchmark ideas that lead to a goal. They also show the connections across different areas of mathematics, technology, and (of course) science -- including gravity, evolution and natural selection, the structure of matter, and the flow of matter and energy in ecosystems.This groundbreaking book is every school's road map to helping children learn science systematically. Using the Atlas of Science Literacy as your guide, trace the prerequisites for learning in each grade, make the connections to support science content, and show the way to the next steps to learning for your students.
Acknowledging the importance of national standards, offers case studies, tips, and tools to encourage student curiosity and improve achievement in science.

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