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An inspirational journey around the world, looking at Stephen's top 80 perennial leafy green vegetables. There are stories of the wild foraging traditions of indigenous people in all continents: from the Maori of New Zealand, the rich traditions of the Mediterranean people, high altitude foods with the Sherpas in the Himalayas and the wild aquatic plant that sustained Native American tribes with a myriad of foodstuffs and other products. Each vegetable is given a thorough description, including its traditions, stories, cultivation, where to source seeds and plants, and how to propagate it. There is also a sprinkling of recipes inspired by local gastronomy. This adventure in climate-friendly vegetable growing is interesting to both traditional vegetable and ornamental gardeners, as well as people interested in permaculture, forest gardening, foraging and ethnobotany. Foreword by Alys Fowler.
An inspirational journey around the temperate world, introducing Stephen's top 80 perennial leafy green vegetables. The reader is introduced to stories of the wild foraging traditions of indigenous people in all continents. It is of interest to both traditional vegetable and even ornamental gardeners, as well as anyone interested in permaculture, forest gardening, foraging, slow-food, gourmet cooking and ethnobotany. "Stephen Barstow presents fascinating and useful information about his top 80 perennial leafy vegetables including lots of historical references, his and others' recipe ideas, along with photos and more. Many of these are easily grown and can be ornamental as well as great edibles. This will be a really useful book helping extend the range of food plants for gardeners." Martin Crawford
One of the most popular novels in Jules Verne's Voyages Extraordinaires series, this book tracks the adventures of affluent Englishman Phileas Fogg, who attempts to swiftly span the globe with his hapless French valet, Passepartout. A case of mistaken identity leads a determined sleuth named Fix to purse Fogg on his trek, which consists primarily of boat and train travel. Published in 1873, the story depicts Fogg and Passepartout at odds with their unfamiliar surroundings while taking in various international wonders.
With information on siting, planting, tending, harvesting, processing, and brewing It’s hard to think about beer these days without thinking about hops. The runaway craft beer market’s convergence with the ever-expanding local foods movement is helping to spur a local-hops renaissance. The demand from craft brewers for local ingredients to make beer—such as hops and barley—is robust and growing. That’s good news for farmers looking to diversify, but the catch is that hops have not been grown commercially in the eastern United States for nearly a century. Today, farmers from Maine to North Carolina are working hard to respond to the craft brewers’ desperate call for locally grown hops. But questions arise: How best to create hop yards—virtual forests of 18-foot poles that can be expensive to build? How to select hop varieties, and plant and tend the bines, which often take up to three years to reach full production? How to best pick, process, and price them for market? And, how best to manage the fungal diseases and insects that wiped out the eastern hop industry 100 years ago, and which are thriving in the hotter and more humid states thanks to climate change? Answers to these questions can be found in The Hop Grower’s Handbook—the only book on the market about raising hops sustainably, on a small scale, for the commercial craft beer market in the Northeast. Written by hop farmers and craft brewery owners Laura Ten Eyck and Dietrich Gehring, The Hop Grower’s Handbook is a beautifully photographed and illustrated book that weaves the story of their Helderberg Hop Farm with the colorful history of New York and New England hop farming, relays horticultural information about the unusual hop plant and the mysterious resins it produces that give beer a distinctively bitter flavor, and includes an overview of the numerous native, heirloom, and modern varieties of hops and their purposes. The authors also provide an easy-to-understand explanation of the beer-brewing process—critical for hop growers to understand in order be able to provide the high-quality product brewers want to buy—along with recipes from a few of their favorite home and micro-brewers. The book also provides readers with detailed information on: • Selecting, preparing, and designing a hop yard site, including irrigation; • Tending to the hops, with details on best practices to manage weeds, insects, and diseases; and, • Harvesting, drying, analyzing, processing, and pricing hops for market. The overwhelming majority of books and resources devoted to hop production currently available are geared toward the Pacific Northwest’s large-scale commercial growers, who use synthetic pesticides, fungicides, herbicides, and fertilizers and deal with regionally specific climate, soils, weeds, and insect populations. Ten Eyck and Gehring, however, focus on farming hops sustainably. While they relay their experience about growing in a new Northeastern climate subject to the higher temperatures and volatile cycles of drought and deluge brought about by global warming, this book will be an essential resource for home-scale and small-scale commercial hops growers in all regions.
This volume represents a contemporary artist's tribute to the endangered plants and flowers of the world. It is both an ecological statement, and a call to arms. It focuses on plant life, of which an estimated 30-60,000 varieties are in imminent danger of extinction. The book's format - each illustration is given its own page - permits the reader to see the detail of each plant's structure. Captions describe the plants' history, uses, and status. Research and information about the threats to each plant's survival amplify the strong conservation message. The book provides both an appreciation of our remaining plant life, as well as an explanation of the facts of a relatively unreported global situation. An appendix provides more than 100 organizations to contact in the US and around the world.
For decades it has been nearly universal dogma among environmentalists and health advocates that cattle and beef are public enemy number one. But is the matter really so clear cut? Hardly, argues environmental lawyer turned rancher Nicolette Hahn Niman in her new book, Defending Beef. The public has long been led to believe that livestock, especially cattle, erode soils, pollute air and water, damage riparian areas, and decimate wildlife populations. In Defending Beef, Hahn Niman argues that cattle are not inherently bad for either the Earth or our own nutritional health. In fact, properly managed livestock play an essential role in maintaining grassland ecosystems by functioning as surrogates for herds of wild ruminants that once covered the globe. Hahn Niman argues that dispersed, grass-fed, small-scale farms can and should become the basis for American food production, replacing the factory farms that harm animals and the environment. The author—a longtime vegetarian—goes on to dispel popular myths about how eating beef is bad for our bodies. She methodically evaluates health claims made against beef, demonstrating that such claims have proven false. She shows how foods from cattle—milk and meat, particularly when raised entirely on grass—are healthful, extremely nutritious, and an irreplaceable part of the world’s food system. Grounded in empirical scientific data and with living examples from around the world, Defending Beef builds a comprehensive argument that cattle can help to build carbon-sequestering soils to mitigate climate change, enhance biodiversity, help prevent desertification, and provide invaluable nutrition. Defending Beef is simultaneously a book about big ideas and the author’s own personal tale—she starts out as a skeptical vegetarian and eventually becomes an enthusiastic participant in environmentally sustainable ranching. While no single book can definitively answer the thorny question of how to feed the Earth’s growing population, Defending Beef makes the case that, whatever the world’s future food system looks like, cattle and beef can and must be part of the solution.
Cancer survivors Domini Kemp and Patricia Daly offer the first comprehensive ketogenic cookbook based on the most exciting new research on nutritional approaches to the prevention and management of cancer. For decades, the ketogenic diet—which shifts the body’s metabolism from burning glucose to burning fat, lowering blood sugar and insulin and resulting in a metabolic state known as ketosis—has been used to successfully manage pediatric epilepsy. More recently, it has been used by the Paleo community as a weight loss strategy. Now emerging research suggests that a ketogenic diet, in conjunction with conventional treatments, also offers new hope for those coping with cancer and other serious disease. With endorsements from leading researchers and oncologists such as Dr. Thomas Seyfried (Cancer as a Metabolic Disease), The Ketogenic Kitchen offers more than 250 recipes, as well as meal plans and comprehensive scientific information about the benefits of a ketogenic diet, with sensible advice to help readers through periods of illness, recovery, and treatment. This North American paperback edition has been updated to include U.S. customary units of measure appearing side-by-side with metric measures.

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