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This carefully crafted ebook: “A PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN (Awakening of Stephen Dedalus)” is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is the first novel of Irish writer James Joyce. An artist’s novel in a modernist style traces the religious and intellectual awakening of young Stephen Dedalus, a fictional alter ego of Joyce and an allusion to Daedalus, the consummate craftsman of Greek mythology. Stephen questions and rebels against the Catholic and Irish conventions under which he has grown, culminating in his self-exile from Ireland to Europe. The work uses techniques that Joyce developed more fully in Ulysses and Finnegans Wake. A Portrait began life in 1903 as Stephen Hero—a projected autobiographical novel in a realistic style. After 25 chapters, Joyce abandoned Stephen Hero in 1907 and set to reworking its themes and protagonist into a condensed five-chapter novel, dispensing with strict realism and making extensive use of free indirect speech that allows the reader to peer into Stephen's developing consciousness. James Joyce (1882-1941) was an Irish novelist and poet, considered to be one of the most influential writers in the modernist avant-garde of the early 20th century. Joyce is best known for Ulysses, a landmark work in which the episodes of Homer's Odyssey are paralleled in an array of contrasting literary styles, perhaps most prominent among these the stream of consciousness technique he utilized.
Discusses the novel, its history, and criticism
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man would establish Joyce as a leader in the movement know as literary modernism. It is set in late 19th century Ireland, and features the education of a young man, Stephen Dedalus, Joyce's alter ego. His education is not only scholarly, but an intellectual, emotional and moral formation as he sheds himself of his Roman Catholic roots and develops as a writer. A Portrait of the Artist is not a breezy read. There's not a whole lot of action either - it's almost all an introspective, impressionistic meandering of a budding author. The plot line and prose can be difficult, which will require a closer reading. That said, this is a cornerstone of literature for its description of a once innocent young boy who grows dissatisfied with the world, and grows at odds with himself philosophically and psychologically. Journey through Joyce's head as a young man as his Dadalus overturns nearly every facet of his life: religion, class, his education, and morality.
Stephen Dedalus, a sensitive and creative youth, rebels against his family, education, and country by committing himself to the artist's lifestyle.
In "A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man," follows rebellious artist Stephen Dedalus as he challenges the conventions of his upbringing; and in "Dubliners," presents stories that evoke the character, atmosphere, and people of Dublin at the turn of thecentury.
"I will not serve that in which I no longer believe, whether it call itself my home, my fatherland or my church: and I will try to express myself in some mode of life or art as freely as I can and as wholly as I can, using for my defence the only arms I allow myself to use -- silence, exile, and cunning." James Joyce's supremely innovative fictional autobiography is also, in the apt phrase of the biographer Richard Ellmann, nothing less than "the gestation of a soul." For as he describes the shabby, cloying, and sometimes terrifying Dublin upbringing of his alter ego, Stephen Dedalus, Joyce immerses the reader in his emerging consciousness, employing language that ranges from baby talk to hellfire sermon to a triumphant artist's manifesto. The result is a novel of immense boldness, eloquence, and energy, a work that inaugurated a literary revolution and has become a model for the portrayal of the self in our time. The text of this edition has been newly edited by Hans Walter Gabler and Walter Hettche and is followed by a new afterword, chronology, and bibliography by Richard Brown.
James Joyce’s "A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man" is considered one of his greatest work. It also can be difficult to understand--it is loaded with themes, imagery, and symbols. If you need a little help understanding it, let BookCaps help with this study guide. Along with chapter-by-chapter summaries and analysis, this book features the full text of Joyce’s classic novel is also included. BookCap Study Guides are not meant to be purchased as alternatives to reading the book.

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